Out Loud

Written by Laura Sorvetti six months ago

Cal Poly’s Geodesic Dome: Then and Now

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This post was written by Amy Strickland (ME ’15), a student assistant in Special Collections and Archives. This summer I worked on several projects in Special Collections and Archives, including scanning all the aerial photographs of campus in the University Archives Photograph

Written by Alex Thomas six months ago

The Sound of Yesterday

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“… President Carter has asked Congress for standby power to ration gasoline…” “Hello! You’re on 91 Talkback.” “Hi, I’d like to talk about the draft…” “…law enforcement officials had predicted that UFW leader Cesar Chavez would lead thousands of striking

Written by Derrick Usher six months ago

Appreciating Special Collections and Archives

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October is American Archives Month and California Archives Month, a time for us to focus on the importance of record keeping and to enhance public recognition for the people and programs that are responsible for maintaining the vital historical records

Written by Jan Kline six months ago

Two books, two marriages, two psychopaths: You Should Have Known, and Gone Girl

Korelitz

These two books could put you off marriage altogether. Every married person has the occasional “who ARE you??” moment with their spouse, but both of these books take it to extremes.

Written by Rachel Scott six months ago

Using Wikipedia in education

Cal Poly Professors Jane Lehr, Sandi Clement and Laura Freberg and Robin Parent from CTLT make up the panel.

Do you use Wikipedia? And if so, do you cite it? Cal Poly Professor Jane Lehr (Women and Gender Studies/Ethnic Studies) asked this question at “Open Access Week 2014 – Teaching and Learning with Wikipedia” on October 24. Most people raised

Written by Rachel Scott six months ago

Open access and the student experience

Liam talks about open access and the student experience.

Imagine a world in which every single person on the planet is given free access to the sum of all human knowledge. – Jimmy Whales, founder of Wikipedia Open access means to have free online access to scholarly research and then have the right to use that research

Written by Karen Lauritsen six months ago

Council of Library Deans supports goals of historic state legislation

California is the first state to pass legislation to ensure that publicly funded research is made available to the public. California Taxpayer Access to Publicly Funded Research Legislation (A.B. 609) was signed into law on September 29, 2014, by Governor Jerry Brown. This new law requires public access to research funded by the California Department of Public Health within 12 months of initial publication. This way, doctors, patients, researchers, educators, students, entrepreneurs, and others can benefit from the research.

Written by Karen Lauritsen six months ago

Exploring Open Data: Campus and city perspectives

Russ talking on open data

Open data has begun to rapidly transform business, government, the sciences, and citizen engagement in the 21st century. Built on the principles of open access, open data promotes free access to datasets to use, re-use and distribute for an ever-growing

Written by Rachel Scott six months ago

Getting into the “school mindset” and starting your quarter off the right way

Students On Stairs

Fall quarter can be a tough transition. Coming from a relaxed, summer state of mind into a hectic, busy, this-is-due-tomorrow mindset is a hard adjustment. However, this transition is something that has to be done sooner or later, and I

Written by Tyler Deitz seven months ago

Introducing our updated and integrated Out Loud blog

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Hey everyone! This is Tyler Deitz, the library’s new web developer student assistant. Starting this summer I have been working on a new iteration of our library’s excellent Out Loud blog, with the main task of unifying the blog’s layout with

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