Research

An Investigation of the Ability to Find and Evaluate Scientific Information In Undergraduate Biology Students
Primary Investigator, Summer 2012-present
Abstract
A cohesive, curriculum-integrated information literacy program is crucial in teaching science majors how to determine information needs, locate, evaluate, synthesize and utilize information. Despite the central importance of this skill to practicing scientists and the scientifically literate public, training in scientific information skills is often piecemeal. This investigation will provide a comparison of the ability of students at different points in their careers to find and evaluate scientific information.
Co-Primary investigator
Jason Blank, Biology Professor, Cal Poly State University
Collaborators
Elena Keeling, Biology Professor, Cal Poly State University
Karen McGaughey, Statistics Professor, Cal Poly State University
Michael Black, Biology Professor, Cal Poly State University

A Study of Faculty Data Service Needs at a Teaching-Centered University
Primary Investigator, Summer 2011–present
Abstract
A Data Services Program was created in Summer 2011 to respond to the emerging need for library-based data consultative and archival services, helping scientists meet scholarly expectations and research funding agency requirements for sharing, reusing, and preserving digital data. An increasing number of academic libraries are providing a diverse range of services and this study seeks to determine the service requirements for the campus faculty through a survey based needs assessment.
Co-Primary Investigator
Marisa Ramirez, Digital Scholarship Services Librarian, Cal Poly State University
Collaborators
Karen McGaughey, Statistics Professor, Cal Poly State University
Tim Strawn, Director of Information Resources and Archives, Cal Poly State University
Anna Gold, University Librarian, Cal Poly State University
Status
Ongoing: survey deployed Spring 2012, statistical analysis and writing in progress

Data Curation: Establishing a Baseline for Scientists' Awareness and Interest in Library Based Infrastructure
Primary Investigator, Fall 2009–Summer 2011
Abstract
Data curation is generally defined as "…the active and on-going management of data through its lifecycle of interest and usefulness to scholarship, science, and education…activities [that] enable data discovery and retrieval, maintain its quality, add value, and provide for re-use over time, and this new field includes authentication, archiving, management, preservation, retrieval, and representation." (GSLIS, University of Illinois) The behavior of humanities and social science researchers and the scope of library involvement in data curation have been well documented and there is extensive, ongoing research in the area. Minimal research has been conducted within the sciences due to complications associated with disciplines, lack of understanding of data collection techniques, etc. With local, state and national focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) research, understanding how science faculty conduct data collection and record their information is crucial in dissemination and sharing knowledge. Libraries must choose how to be involved in this process and one of the first components to be considered is the current awareness of researchers concerning data curation.
Primary Investigator
Marisa Ramirez, Digital Repository Librarian, Cal Poly State University
Collaborator
Karen McGaughey, Statistics Professor, Cal Poly State University
Status
Results published in College & Research Libraries (C&RL), July 2012

Cal Poly State University Science Café Evaluation Study
Lead Researcher, Fall 2009–Spring 2010
Abstract
Participant feedback has been invaluable sources of information for the Cal Poly State University since the inception of the program in 2008. Feedback allows us to constantly learn and make adjustments to our programming. Feedback has been collected via paper comment cards, blog postings Facebook comments, word of mouth, and emails. Recently two new online surveys has been developed to collect data on the perspectives of presenters and attendees on the effectiveness of the Science Café in accomplishing established informal learning goals, their satisfaction with their experience, and collecting of new ideas to improve the program. This survey was loosely based on the NOVA scienceNOW Science Cafés Evaluation, 2007 by Goodman Research Group.
Collaborator
Catherine Trujillo, Special Collections and Exhibits Library Assistant, Cal Poly State University.
Status
Results published in Issues in Science and Technology Librarianship (ISTL), Fall 2010, http://www.istl.org/10-fall/refereed4.html

ARL New Model Publications Study
Participating Researcher, Spring 2008
Abstract
ARL conducted a study of new kinds of scholarly works, generally described as new-model publications. The study had two segments: phase one, field study, engaged over 300 librarian volunteers to perform structured conversations with faculty members at their institutions to learn about new model publications that are currently in use by scholars and researchers from across the disciplinary spectrum; phase two, wrote a final report based on an analysis of the collected works that identified patterns and trends in the evolution of these new models.
Status
Results published November 2008: Study report available online http://www.arl.org/sc/models/model-pubs/study.shtml
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