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Posts from the ‘Stories’ Category

Holy Banned Books, Batman!

From  examinations of the fallibility of our heroes to subversive social commentaries to moving memoirs and coming-of-age stories, the comic book genre has long surpassed it’s humble good versus evil origins. Maybe that’s what makes comic books so much more susceptible to challenges and bannings than other book genres: instead of easily-digested, two-dimensional stories, the genre increasingly challenges its readers to think beyond their comfort zone.

Dr. Dustin Stegner, who offers Graphic Narratives class here at Cal Poly exploring comics and graphic novels, addresses this issue and more in our latest video celebrating Banned Books Week, September 21 – 27, 2014.

 

You can find the books Dr. Stegner mentions here at the Robert E. Kennedy Library:

Alan Moore, Batman: The killing joke

Craig Thompson, Blankets

And you can read more about the Moore Collections of Underground Comix on the Kennedy Library Out Loud blog.

 

 

 

 

Nettie Sinsheimer – Quite a Woman!

Wendy Myren is a history graduate student (Spring ‘15) completing an internship in Special Collections and Archives. She is working on a project to organize the correspondence of the Sinsheimer family of San Luis Obispo. This is the second in a series of blog posts in which she shares some of her experiences in the internship and some of the stories she uncovers. Read Wendy’s first and second posts.

 

The Sinsheimer Family, circa 1893 (Sinsheimer Collection, Special Collections and Archives, California Polytechnic State University, 036-8-05-122-05-01)

The Sinsheimer Family, circa 1893 (Sinsheimer Collection, Special Collections and Archives, California Polytechnic State University, 036-8-05-122-05-01)

Jeanette “Nettie” Weil married Aron Sinsheimer at the young age of seventeen, and bore him ten children in eighteen years (One of the children, Fernanda, died at a young age from complications from polio).  I must admit that initially going into this project I assumed that Aron and Nettie had strict gender roles reflective of the late-19th and early-20th centuries.  How wrong was I!  Nettie is by far the most headstrong, proactive, and independent women I have had the pleasure of reading about.  According to the history of the family that I used as a reference (Sinton’s The Sinsheimer Brothers of San Luis Obispo and San Francisco), Nettie was a busy woman and frequently referred to as “the general” by her family. Read more

More from the Sinsheimer Family letters: from civil war to earthquake

Wendy Myren is a history graduate student (Spring ‘15) completing an internship in Special Collections and Archives. She is working on a project to organize the correspondence of the Sinsheimer family of San Luis Obispo. This is the second in a series of blog posts in which she shares some of her experiences in the internship and some of the stories she uncovers. Read Wendy’s first post here.

A Civil War Veteran in San Luis Obispo

In 1862, when he was in early twenties, Aron Sinsheimer joined the 120th Ohio Volunteer Infantry (OVI), a regiment organized in Mansfield, Ohio. Read more

The hidden history within letters: the Sinsheimer Family Correspondence

Wendy Myren is a history graduate student (Spring ‘15) completing an internship in Special Collections and Archives. She is working on a project to organize the correspondence of a historic family of San Luis Obispo. This is the first in a series of blog posts in which she shares some of her experiences in the internship and some of the stories she uncovers.

 

My name is Wendy Myren and I am a history graduate student at Cal Poly.  This summer I am interning at Special Collections and Archives.  In this internship, my duties include: processing collections, preserving material, and enabling access of this material to other researchers.  Upon my arrival at Special Collections and Archives, I learned safe handling techniques and valuable tips on how to preserve these historical treasures.

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A Controversial Commencement: Cal Poly and Ronald Reagan, 1974

This post is written by Alex Thomas (HIST ’16), Student Assistant in Special Collections and Archives. Alex reflects on another Cal Poly commencement, back in 1974. And it turns out some of the topics from forty years ago still ring true today.

“There is one thing I do know: the world has improved in many ways since I was on the receiving end of a graduation speech.”

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The New Atascadero Library: Turning vision into reality

This post is written by Katherine O’Clair, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences Librarian.

On Saturday, June 7, I had the joy and privilege to attend the grand opening of the new Atascadero (Public) Library. The large crowd anxiously awaiting the ribbon-cutting included families, residents, community leaders, and library staff. This was a great day for which many had waited a long time.

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Student Assistants of the Library: Roxanne Hoffman

Packing, scanning, and checking-in texts and media might sound a little boring, but without it, we wouldn’t have access to a lot of valuable stuff. And for student assistant Roxanne Hoffman, this is all in a day’s work with Interlibrary Loan at Kennedy Library.

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