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Posts from the ‘Sensible Shoes: Book Reviews’ Category

The Dinner, by Herman Koch

After reading this book, I’ll never be hazy on the concept of the unreliable narrator again. Read more

Post-Soviet Nebbish

When I learned that the title of novelist Gary Shteyngart’s new memoir was Little Failure, I thought he was doing his usual self-deprecating shtick. When I read that, translated into RussGlish — Failurchka — it was his mother’s pet name for him, I realized that there was going to be more than just comedy in this story. Read more

The Signature of All Things, by Elizabeth Gilbert

Yes, I read and liked Eat, Pray, Love like the rest of female America of a certain age. But I also enjoyed Elizabeth Gilbert’s earlier fiction, especially Stern Men, set in the world of Maine’s lobster fishing industry. Read more

Want Not, by Jonathan Miles

Anyone who can embroider a letter of complaint into a great tragicomic novel is worth following, in my book. So when I heard that Jonathan Miles (author of Dear American Airlines) had a new one out, my page turning finger started to itch. Read more

Dissident Gardens, by Jonathan Lethem

I’ve missed the last few books by Jonathan Lethem, but remember liking some of his earlier ones, especially Motherless Brooklyn, an unforgettable novel about a detective with Tourette syndrome. Read more

& Sons, by David Gilbert

I seem to be on a jag: novels about novelists. I was wowed by Meg Wolitzer’s The Wife, and before that, loved David Gilbert’s & Sons. Read more

My Education, by Susan Choi

This novel starts off typically enough with a grad student crush on a charismatic professor. Read more