A woman with long hair and a blue, black and white top stands in front of a poster proposing a kinesiology research project. She is talking to a blonde woman standing in the foreground with her back to the camera.

Written by on March 13, 2013

Kinesiology and Kennedy

A newly renovated first floor gallery means that I get to be privy to new and exciting ideas almost constantly. In January, it was the 2nd year architecture students’ Julia Morgan-inspired projects. For the last several weeks, it has been fun drawings by Cal Poly students. Today, it was a journey into the world of health and body, when students in Kinesiology 319, Introductory Research Methods, presented their research proposals in the gallery.

Kinesiology assistant professor Heather Starnes made great use of the gallery space for a one-hour poster session with her class this morning, when students talked through posters detailing their research proposals and took turns critiquing the proposals of other students.

A blonde woman in black raises a hand to gesture as she explains her project to another woman. Behind them, at least six students in formalwear look at project posters on the wall.

I got to be a fly on the wall as students detailed experiments to contrast the effects of SSRI reuptake inhibitors to the effects of exercise in battling depression, or use a literature review to compare and contrast three different neurological diseases, or examine how the weight gain of a pregnant woman affects the BMI of her baby.

A blond woman stands in the foreground, examining the white wall of the gallery, which is lined with black-and-white research project proposal posters. A man in the background, standing beside the wall, looks at the camera.

The gallery space is one resource for faculty who want to get students out of the classroom and into interactive, collaborative learning environments. It’s an awesome reminder of how important Learn by Doing is to the Cal Poly education.

Reserve the space through exhibits at Kennedy Library.

Watch Heather Starnes talk about how kinesiology can inform city planning in a short video from Cal Poly Science Cafe.

See fun photos of students’ gallery drawings when it’s not in use on our Facebook page.

Check out my story on the architecture display on the blog!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

top